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We must never celebrate death in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict

With a death toll nearing 900, one cannot begin to imagine the anger that the people of Gaza must feel towards the occupation

Yara al-Wazir

Published: Updated:

The images of death coming out of Gaza are haunting. They convey a picture of soil that is drenched in innocent civilian blood, and young children who have lost their futures.

With a death toll nearing 900, one cannot begin to imagine the anger that the people of Gaza must feel towards the occupation. Still, this time is no excuse to celebrate death, kidnappings, or despair of the Israelis, else we run into an ongoing cycle of hatred, and we are doing nothing but fuelling the fire for more massacres.

Children of Gaza born with a death sentence

Anger is a natural emotion to feel when human life is lost due to no particular reason. In one corner of the world people fight to end the death penalty, whereas in Gaza, the death penalty is something children are born with.

If we want to be angry, our anger must be cast on those who are silent in this critical time, such as the organizations that preach equality and human rights yet don’t recognize the people of Gaza as humans.

The public was so quick to drop the ball when Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony’s army was kidnapping children – at least they were reportedly kept alive. But Palestinian children die every day, and the world is silent on acting.

With a death toll nearing 900, one cannot begin to imagine the anger that the people of Gaza must feel towards the occupation

Yara al-Wazir

The International Criminal Court is silent on war crimes and toxic weapons, the United Nations is mostly quiet on the breaking of resolutions, and the only form of intervention that governments are offering is in the form of empty words and promises.

I do not call for military intervention, or weapons for retaliation, rather an arms and trade embargo on all those involved in the conflict. In times of desperation, words mean nothing; it is action and response that we need.

Wouldn’t wish this on my enemy

The celebration goes both ways. Israelis have been quoted saying that the bombings on Gaza give them “orgasms;” an Israeli MP has called for the massacre of Palestinian children, and likewise, there have been celebrations of Israeli kidnappings and deaths from the oppressed side of the occupation in the form of reduced prices on sweets and social media updates.

A little part of me dies whenever I see this – I don’t know how much hate one must have to wish death upon innocent civilians.

I have personally lost people in the conflict, yet I do not wish my feelings and what I had to go through or the trauma that my family suffers on a daily basis on anyone, not even my worst enemy. Human life is precious, and it must be celebrated. We do that by staying alive and by calling for the coexistence of both sides of the conflict.

I can’t help but wonder what the point of the ground invasion on Gaza is, nor can I comprehend why Hamas continues to fire rockets that are being intercepted and diverted.

Lives are being lost, money is lost, and humanity is lost along the way, and all we can do is sit behind our computers and latch on to any tiny bit of hope we find. But there is no hope in death, there is no hope in kidnappings, and there is no hope in terror.

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Yara al-Wazir is a humanitarian activist. She is the founder of The Green Initiative ME and a developing partner of Sharek Stories. She can be followed and contacted on twitter @YaraWazir

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.