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The Lebanese army needs our support and solidarity

What concerns us in is our national army, the symbol of the county’s unity and steadfastness.

Nayla Tueni

Published: Updated:

We hope our compassionate mother Lebanon speeds up the process of handing our national army the arms promised under the Saudi generous donation last year. It should also add its own donation as a symbol of the historical relationship between the two countries - the close cultural and lingual relation which still largely influences our social structure - and as a symbol that Francophone “influence” continues in the region.

It’s also preferable that the international community supports the Lebanese army with arms, ammunition and surveillance and tapping equipment which could contribute to deterring terrorists who continue to attempt invading border towns and infiltrate sabotage them, thus harming our strength which has so far stood its ground. These terrorists’ attempts have united the Lebanese people around their military institution and the rest of security forces who’ve done a good job at imposing security and detaining terrorist cells and who’ve prevented Lebanon dragging itself into the Syrian war or into the bosom of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

Our army needs a rhetoric that supersedes politics, parties and sects

Nayla Tueni

What concerns us in is our national army, the symbol of the county’s unity and steadfastness. It’s the country’s backbone and its fate and the fate of the country have been tampered with during the era of interference in our country - an era which kicked off in 1975. This army is our best bet for the future and we have seen what happens when the army doesn’t play a role in the country.

This army does not only deserve a salute of solidarity from us and it does not only deserve a tribute to its martyrs who keep on falling to defend our security and stability. It also deserves that we - by all means possible - stand by it in its continuous war against terrorists. The army which is sacrificing its soldiers’ lives and which counts on its soldiers’ bravery needs solid national unity that provides it with an efficient cover. The army also needs to save its energy and effort for border confrontations and battles instead of being distracted it in the streets and alleys where politicians can control their followers and supporters and prevent them from stirring small problems which consume energy and time. Perhaps more cooperation is also required from Palestinian leaders in refugee camps as well as outside them as they can help hand over wanted men and prevent turning the camps into a safe haven for takfirists and terrorists.

Our army needs a rhetoric that supersedes politics, parties and sects. It deserves special attention and embracement. It needs us to stand by the families of martyrs = so the martyrs’ sons can feel proud of their fathers and of the institution to which the latter belonged. They must feel proud of the country which these martyrs’ blood was spilled for. We don’t need this just so the martyrs’ sons can go on but we also need it so we and Lebanon stand our ground.

This article was first published in al-Nahar on January 27, 2015.

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Nayla Tueni is one of the few elected female politicians in Lebanon and of the two youngest. She became a member of parliament in 2009 and following the assassination of her father, Gebran, she is currently a member of the board and Deputy General Manager of Lebanon’s leading daily, Annahar. Prior to her political career, Nayla had trained, written in and managed various sections of Annahar, where she currently has a regular column. She can be followed on Twitter @NaylaTueni

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.