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On hiding behind a pseudonym

The history of literature is full of prominent authors and poets who used pseudonyms to test their styles and ideas

Turki Aldakhil

Published: Updated:

It is people’s rights to express their opinions within the context of common laws, regulations and values, and by either using a pseudonym or their real name. For example, the requirements, conditions and bases of expressing one’s opinion on Twitter are the same whether or not the user is anonymous.

The history of literature is full of prominent authors and poets who used pseudonyms to test their styles and ideas, or to protect their posts or status in society.

Fear and weakness

The problem nowadays lies in hiding behind a fake name to attack and defame. Hiding behind a pseudonym is a sign of fear and a desire for revenge. Some of those who do so suffer from a psychopathic crisis, as they have issues with their society and want to criticize and libel others without confronting them or making a public appearance.

Hiding behind a pseudonym while expressing opinions that sometimes harmonize with rogue or terrorist groups reflects weakness, and a lack of morals and values

Turki Al-Dakhil

However, hiding behind a pseudonym while expressing opinions that sometimes harmonize with rogue or terrorist groups reflects weakness, and a lack of morals and values. Saudi rules strictly criminalize those who attack others. This is justice and the implementation of civil formulas.

This article was first published in Okaz on May 5, 2016.
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Turki Al-Dakhil is the General Manager of Al Arabiya News Channel. He began his career as a print journalist, covering politics and culture for the Saudi newspapers Okaz, Al-Riyadh and Al-Watan. He then moved to pan-Arab daily Al-Hayat and pan-Arab news magazine Al-Majalla. Turki later became a radio correspondent for the French-owned pan-Arab Radio Monte Carlo and MBC FM. He proceeded to Elaph, an online news magazine and Alarabiya.net, the news channel’s online platform. Over a ten-year period, Dakhil’s weekly Al Arabiya talk show “Edaat” (Spotlights) provided an opportunity for proponents of Arab and Islamic social reform to make their case to a mass audience. Turki also owns Al Mesbar Studies and Research Centre and Madarek Publishing House in Dubai. He has received several awards and honors, including the America Abroad Media annual award for his role in supporting civil society, human rights and advancing women’s roles in Gulf societies. He tweets @TurkiAldakhil.

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.