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Lebanon’s municipal elections and presidential vacuum

Political parties have deprived people of their right to make independent choices within their local authority

Nayla Tueni

Published: Updated:

Whatever the outcome of Sunday’s municipal elections in Beqaa and Beirut, people in Lebanon were thrilled to practice democracy.

It was beautiful to witness, especially after the consecutive political crises that suffocated the country’s democratic pulse.

Optimism

The elections contained many flaws, mainly due to the dominance of political affiliations and money, but we cannot ignore their significance at a time when Lebanon is depicted as a failed state. Citizens were able to vent suppressed frustration.

Political parties have deprived people of their right to make independent choices within their local authority.

However, holding the elections was a lot better than not doing so or delaying them, particularly as in two weeks Lebanon will mark two years of a presidential vacuum. The Lebanese people are casting their votes instead of submitting to captivity.

This article was first published in an-Nahar on May 09, 2016.
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Nayla Tueni is one of the few elected female politicians in Lebanon and of the two youngest. She became a member of parliament in 2009 and following the assassination of her father, Gebran, she is currently a member of the board and Deputy General Manager of Lebanon’s leading daily, Annahar. Prior to her political career, Nayla had trained, written in and managed various sections of Annahar, where she currently has a regular column. She can be followed on Twitter @NaylaTueni

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.