.
.
.
.

Mohammed bin Nayef and the goals of national unity

Mashari Althaydi

Published: Updated:

As we say, being healthy can only be treasured and envied by those who are sick.

The Middle East is tormented by disasters:Arabs and Muslims, from Afghanistan and Pakistan in the east, to Libya, Mali and Niger in the west; from Iraq, Iran, and maybe a part of Central Asia in the north, to Yemen and Somalia in the south.

There are also security, humanitarian and economic disasters, but the greatest calamity in my opinion, is the fragmentation of our unity, the outbreak of the disunion and the dismantling of the common grounds.

In brief, the danger is interrelated with the survival or the dissolution of national unity. If people lose their faith in national unity, we should expect unpredictable calamities, the collapse of the nation’s immunity and the transformation of nations into pockets of interferences and foreign invasions from all sides. What we are witnessing in Libya and Syria is the best (or rather the most sinister) examples.

Meeting of ministers

During the most recent ministerial conference held in Riyadh for the Ministers of Interior, Defense and Foreign Affairs of the Arab Gulf States, the Saudi Crown Prince and Minister of Interior, Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, tackled in his speech the issue of national unity. “We can preserve the security and stability of our countries and peoples, as well as the development and prosperity they enjoy,” he said.

If people lose their faith in national unity, we should expect unpredictable calamities, the collapse of the nation’s immunity and the transformation of nations into pockets of interferences and foreign invasions from all sides. What we are witnessing in Libya and Syria is the best (or rather the most sinister) examples.

Mashari Althaydi


“The biggest challenge for any country in our modern world is to preserve its national unity away from any internal or external influence or threat,” he added.

What type of unity did the Saudi Crown Prince mean? “A national unity in which loyalty to the homeland prevails over the personal, ethnic or sectarian ones that are meant to divide and not unite,” he explained.

“A national unity in which everyone knows the duties towards the homeland and nation, and works for the security and stability of the society,” he added.

What really matters is protecting the national unity where there is no room for disparities among citizens on sectarian, religious, regional, racial, ethnic or political grounds.

It might seem easy to abide by these standards, but in fact, it is rather very difficult and challenging.

How can we explain the obscure, mutual sectarian mobilization in Syria and Iraq? How can we explain the increasing separatist nationalism of the Kurds?

How can we explain the sectarian tyranny in Iraq, and trying to instal sectarian tyranny in Lebanon?

How can we explain the rivalry in Yemen between northerners and southerners, northern northerners, Houthis, reformists, socialists, secularists, Sufis and Hadhramis?

We do not want to abolish diversity as it is impossible anyway. Diversity is the base and the secret recipe of cultural continuity.

We are talking about transforming this diversity into axes that shape the rock of national unity.

The article was first published in Asharq Al-Awsat.
___________________
Saudi journalist Mshari Al Thaydi presents Al Arabiya News Channel’s “views on the news” daily show “Maraya.” He has previously held the position of a managing senior editor for Saudi Arabia & Gulf region at pan-Arab newspaper Asharq al-Awsat. Al Thaydi has published several papers on political Islam and social history of Saudi Arabia. He appears as a guest on several radio and television programs to discuss the ideologies of extremist groups and terrorists.

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.