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Confronting the Qatari regime’s allegations against the UAE

Mohammed Al-Hammadi

Published: Updated:

It’s quite ironic that a day after Qatar’s appeal to the International Court of Justice to take measures against the UAE, claiming that the UAE is discriminating against Qatari citizens, several international human rights organizations testified about the UAE’s achievements in human rights.

This occurred during the UN Human Rights Council’s session at Geneva aimed at adopting the UAE’s third report on the human rights situation in the country.

What was acknowledged during this session is yet another confession by the world’s countries and the international community that the UAE’s human rights record has developed. The UAE always works to improve human rights, and has succeeded in providing security and applying the law on everyone in the country, which is home to over 200 nationalities.

Qatar has gone far with its dispute with its neighbors. It went as far as resorting to the ICJ and the Human Rights Council as after it lost its media battle with the boycotting countries and spent billions on media figures, media institutions and public relations companies, it endeavored on another miserable attempt which is to use international institutions

Mohammed Al-Hammadi

Empty accusations

In response to Qatar’s allegations and its complaint at the ICJ at The Hague against the UAE, claiming that it’s discriminating against Qataris, the UAE refuted all claims while Qatar failed to provide convincing and documented evidence to the court to back its claims.

All that Qatar based its allegations on are undocumented reports by Qatari human rights organizations or international reports in which no official measures have been taken. Therefore, the court cannot take these reports into account because Qatar leaked them without the permission of the relevant parties.

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Meanwhile, the biggest loss which Doha suffered last week was related to the four boycotting countries banning Qatari flights from entering their airspace.

After the International Civil Aviation Organization decided to give Qatar a chance and listen to its demands, the four boycotting countries decided to submit a dispute against Qatar regarding their sovereign airspace to the ICJ as it is the relevant authority.

They also sought the ICAO’s approval to look into Qatar’s illegal claims as it departs from the technical competence of the organization, especially that the crux of the issue is Qatar’s support of terrorism and activities that incite strife in the region’s countries. Accordingly, the four states will continue to close their regional airspace to Qatari aircrafts in order to preserve their national security and sovereign right guaranteed by international law.

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This is expected to last for a long time since the appeals and hearings of the ICJ are expected to take a while before a decision is made.

Qatar has gone far with its dispute with its neighbors. It went as far as resorting to the ICJ and the Human Rights Council as after it lost its media battle with the boycotting countries and spent billions on media figures, media institutions and public relations companies, it endeavored on another miserable attempt which is to use international institutions and human rights organizations to pressure the anti-terror quartet. However, we are certain that it will lose this battle because very simply “the solution is in Riyadh.”

This article is also available in Arabic.

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Mohammed Al-Hammadi is the Editor-in-Chief of Al Ittihad newspaper and Executive Director of editing and publishing at the Abu Dhabi Media Company. He founded and was Editor-in-Chief of the Arabic edition of National Geographic magazine, and has held numerous positions in journalism since joining Al Ittihad in 1994. Al-Hammadi has been a columnist for more than 15 years, including writing a daily column for seven years and producing a weekly political column in Al Ittihad since 2001. He has also worked as a parliamentary editor for seven years, covering the proceedings of the Federal National Council in the United Arab Emirates. In addition to being an active participant on social networks, Al-Hammadi has an interest in new media and is currently working on a project to ease the transition from traditional to digital and smart media. Al-Hammadi has received numerous awards and is a member of a number of organizations and federations. He features regularly in broadcast media as a regional political commentator and has authored several books including Time of Ordeal (2008), The UAE Democracy (2009) and The Fall of the Muslim Brotherhood (2016). Twitter: @MEalhammadi.

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