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Facebook’s doctrine and the people of Silicon

Mashari Althaydi

Published: Updated:

What does Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter founder Jack Dorsey have in common?

Many things, as they are both young men who are fond of technology, extremely rich and famous, and hate formal clothing. They are the “cool” guys. However, what’s more important is that they are both the founders of Silicon Valley, the stronghold of the software industry and digital and social media in California.

This stronghold is called by some “the government of the secret world” considering the size and influence that these companies’ platforms and applications have on the world’s people, and on the state of conflict and harmony in the entire world.

The aim according to the “philosophy” of these makers of the new communicative world goes beyond accumulating wealth and raising the company’s worth in the stock market by “fattening” and increasing the number of users. The aim here, or rather the doctrine, is “changing the world”

Mashari Althaydi

This stronghold, as acknowledged by one of its major figures, Zuckerberg, is an “extremely left-leaning place” as he stated in his famous testimony before the American Congress some time ago.

Therefore, the news report about Facebook’s, or rather Zuckerberg’s, sway over a senior employee in the company because he supports President Trump is nothing strange.

According to one of the most shocking stories published by The Wall Street Journal ten days ago, Zuckerberg pressured Palmer Luckey, co-founder of Oculus and one of the Facebook Inc. executives, to stop his support for Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Political objectives

The aim according to the “philosophy” of these makers of the new communicative world goes beyond accumulating wealth and raising the company’s worth in the stock market by “fattening” and increasing the number of users. The aim here, or rather the doctrine, is “changing the world.” In 2015 during a conference call with Wall Street analysts, Zuckerberg was asked why investors would be interested in getting involved in the labour market in African countries.

Zuckerberg’s answer was interesting as he said: “If we were only focused on making money we might put all of our energy on just increasing ads to people in the US and the other most developed countries.”

An article by Mark Niller, a German journalist, included this interesting description, that Zuckerberg established his giant company on the idea of “upholding the individual and reducing the institution.”

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He added that Facebook experts viewed these global platforms as the forum that people of dictatorial countries used to fight for democracy and freedom. Their favorite slogan is “people trust people (like them), not institutions.”

We are thus before a revolutionary model disguised as a business or (why not?) by using business itself and the language of stocks, stock exchange and mergers, but deep within, there remains a solid seed that draws the ruling principle.

Does autism, which most of this industry’s stars suffered from as Peter Thiel, one of Facebook’s first investors, said in an interview with the New Yorker, also explained the personal dimension in these people’s obsession with sanctifying the new virtual world?

Perhaps.

This article is also available in Arabic.

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Saudi journalist Mshari Al Thaydi @MAlthaydy presents Al Arabiya News Channel’s “Views on the News” daily show, “Maraya.” He has previously held the position of a managing senior editor for Saudi Arabia & the Gulf region at pan-Arab newspaper Asharq al-Awsat. Al Thaydi has published several papers on political Islam and social history of Saudi Arabia. He appears as a guest on several radio and television programs to discuss the ideologies of extremist groups and terrorists.

Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.
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